Saturday, April 13, 2013

The Rug: A Progress Report



 In my introduction post for this project I shared that it was going to take much more fabric than I originally anticipated and that I was slow at weaving. Both of those are still true statements. This is going to take me awhile.

But really, that is ok. I've already gotten through a lengthy audio book and have watched countless documentaries on Netflix. I find the whole thing rather soothing.


 Keep up with this crazy DIY rug adventure by following along on Bloglovin'!

9 comments:

  1. This is so cool! It really demonstrates how much you like to work with fibers. I can't wait to see the finished product, however many documentaries later that will be. :)

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  2. I just can't get over this rug. So awesome! When I make things, especially for the first time, they always look so, so, so HOMEMADE! This looks like something I find at craft shows and can never afford. Thanks for sharing. The pics are awesome too. I might have to seriously consider making something like this, but thinking I should start with a placemat. :)

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    1. Thank you! I was really pleased with how it turned out. I think part of why it looks less "homemade" is that it was a twisting weave with two strands for each pass instead of the classic over-under. Without the warp exposed, the rug looks denser.

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  3. I am so anxious to try this! I want to start with a placement. I love the tight knit of the weave in your project. How far apart did you place your nails? Also, did you find that the nails on the sides worked okay instead of having a straight rod piece like the people at Hen Scratch Quilting use for their looms? I want to try it - but don't have $135 for a loom since this is a new project for me so I thought maybe you could give some hints on how to you made the loom?

    Thank you!

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    1. Gina, do NOT spend $135 on a loom! Especially since you are just starting. I hate spending lots of money on a hobby until I know that I will continue to enjoy it. We used warped 2x4s out of my parents barn to make the loom and it worked just fine. Keith screwed it together at the corners.
      The nails on the edge worked just fine for me although if you want a perfectly smooth, even edge you might want a rod. There is a spot were I first got started where I was pulling the weft too tight and it is bowed in a bit. It was easy to correct the tension though - just don't pull so hard. When I first pulled the rug off the loom it had little puckers where the nails were but after a few days of walking on it the fibers relaxed and evened themselves out.
      ALSO, during the weaving. I totally sat on a stool in the middle with my feet down in the warp. I just moved the stool as i worked. With the loom laying flat like I had it, i think it would have been impossible to make it otherwise. well, maybe not impossible but you would have a wicked sore back.

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    2. I think i placed my nails .75 inches apart on the ends and 3 inches apart where they were acting as a "rod"

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    3. ALSO, ALSO, if you look up a few pictures, you can see that I had more than one piece of the warp hooked over the "rod" nails. I treated each as an individual when weaving, but having multiple pieces hooked over the nails helped counter all the tension across the rug. I hope that makes sense...

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  4. OMG!! This is fabulous. Thank you so much for this.

    I am a quilter and have been playing with knitting reclaimed t-shirts, but after spending some time on Salt Spring Island I fell in love with some of the hand weaving there. When I mentioned my interest to some artist friends they initially started asking/mentioning looms, but I am a little too frugal to outlay for a new experiment. (An accountant by trade) :)

    I did some stick weaving over the week and plan to have hubster build me a larger version to do some 24 inch widths, but this was fab for an even larger project down the road. Yippee kai ya!!

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